The Authority of the Neutral Judge


Anyone who has been to a Yankee game in the Bronx knows that the umpire’s best day is when the fans forget he’s on the field. In his mind, he only gets recognized after having made a mistake. One can’t help but see the parallel to the United States Supreme Court in light of the past week’s rulings on issues from same-sex marriage to health care. Chief Justice John Roberts sees himself in a similar situation to the umpire in his role on the Supreme Court.

In the Chief Justice’s mind, “umpires don’t make the rules, they help apply them. While the rules are made elsewhere the role of an umpire is critical. They help everybody play by the rules, but it is a limited role. Nobody ever went to a ballgame to see the umpire.” [1]

In this way the role of the Supreme Court and the OIX registry are somewhat similar. The Open Identity Exchange registry is given multiple sets of rules and by publishing them for all to see makes enforcement possible. The Open Identity Exchange’s trust registry make enforcement possible in

three ways. First it exposes an organization’s compliance to a set of rules (whitelists, trust frameworks, etc.) to the judgement of its peers. None has a keener interest in a companies compliance than its competitors. The second enforcement dynamic is the powerful binding of an organization’s public self attestation to a set of legal claims and technical tests. The brand risk alone ensures a company thinks carefully before publicly declaring compliance. Lastly, the OIXnet.org registry invites a crowd sourced scrutiny of claims of conformance. In this way Open Identity Exchange uses a minimal viable governance approach to support a diverse set of trust frameworks, whitelists, listing services, etc.

A general purpose registry like OIXnet, as a neutral third-party publisher of rule sets, is able to provide authoritative information to all stakeholders on behalf of a variety of registrants. It is as if the umpire has outlined the strike zone in neon tape for the entire stadium to see. It would be hard for batters to argue when all of the information is available for anyone to see. Each set of the business, legal and technical requirements of a trust framework registered at OIXnet.org will be the neon tape for all to see. Through a “transparency drives trust” value proposition, “anyone, at anytime, anywhere, can see everything registered in the OIXnet.org registry without charge.” [2]

Although Justice Roberts is right that, “nobody ever went to a ballgame to see the umpire,” it would be hard to argue that it makes his role any less important. Although Open Identity Exchange will never develop its own trust frameworks, it would be hard to argue the role of the OIXnet.org registry any less important

[1] Rosen, Jeffrey. “John Roberts, the Umpire in Chief.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 27 June 2015. Web. 29 June 2015.
[2] OIXnet.org

Source:: Trusted Transactions

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